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G-Force Speeds for Wicked Racing in Jet Sprint Boat Racing Series

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Pulling 7 G-Forces around corners is part of the intense experience involved in Jet Sprint Boat Racing. The course is raw, competitors run in water channels that are only 15 feet wide and three feet deep.

Wicked Racing Team in its Jet Sprint Boat
Wicked Racing Team in its Jet Sprint Boat

Macraft Hull from New Zealand holds 358 cubic inch Chevrolet motor with titanium valve aluminum heads
Macraft Hull from New Zealand holds 358 cubic inch Chevrolet motor with titanium valve aluminum heads
Racers and their navigators have to right corner at least 32 times in less than a minute through a maze of islands. “If you want more G-Forces in a motorsport, buy an aircraft,” said Wicked Racing Team driver Dan Morrison. “It’s like a roller coaster with a throttle on steroids, only way more intense. The first time I raced I felt like my eyeballs vacated from the side left of my head.”
G-Force speeds make Jet Sprint Boat Racing feel like a roller coaster with a throttle on steroids
G-Force speeds make Jet Sprint Boat Racing feel like a roller coaster with a throttle on steroids

Dan Morrison leads in Super Modified Division after Webb's Slough Track race in St. John, Washington
Dan Morrison leads in Super Modified Division after Webb's Slough Track race in St. John, Washington

Jet Sprint Boat Racing is also about memory. Drivers and navigators are given a rotation schedule one day before a race. “We don’t get to test the boat on the course,” said Morrison. “We get to look at the track on paper and walk the course. There are no arrows or flags, just a maze of islands we have to race through from memory.”

The boats touch the water for the first time during qualifying. If racers miss a corner, they are eliminated from the competition. “Even the fans feel the intensity,” said Morrison. “We can see the crowds and they can see us. There are no blind spots on the track and that makes it a neat fan sport.”

Morrison won the Super Modified Division at the Webb’s Slough Track in St. John, Washington. “Our times beat all the boats there,” he said. “That’s including the 1000 plus horsepower methanol injected boats in other classes.”

Wicked Racing’s boat has a Macraft hull from New Zealand. It is 12 feet two inches long and is equipped with a 358 cubic inch Chevrolet motor. The boat also has titanium valve aluminum heads. “We use K&N Engineering oil and air filters,” said Morrison. “K&N is the reason we’re in the Winner’s Circle. K&N protects our engines and gives us additional horsepower when we race.”

Sprint Boat Track racing began in New Zealand about 25-years-ago. The sport hit America about 10-years-ago. “I use to race motorcycles and quads and then I saw this type of racing on television,” said Morrison. “I went to my first race and was hooked. I bought a boat and never looked back.

Wicked Racing will be teaming up with Super Boat World Champion Tom Nelson. “We’ll be top contenders in each class,” said Morrison. “We are serious about this sport.”

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K&N Engineering, Inc., with headquarters in Riverside, California, has been the world's leader in performance filter technology since 1969, serving the needs of the automotive, motorcycle, marine, industrial and military markets. K&N is heavily involved in nearly every form of motorsports from off-road and powersports to drag racing, stock cars and road racing. For more information about K&N Filters, please contact K&N Engineering, Inc., P.O. Box 1329, Riverside, CA 92502-1329, (800) 213-4182 for a dealer near you, (800) 858-3333 for technical service/questions, (951) 826-4001 Fax, e-mail tech@knfilters.com, or visit www.knfilters.com.