SEARCH BY VEHICLE

The United States Lawn Mower Racing Association Continues to Grow

       Printer Image
Lawn Mower Race folklore began something like this: A bunch of guys were sitting around in a pub in Britain thirty years ago and were lamenting about the extreme costs of motorsports. They were sitting at a booth with a big window where the view was a mental institution across the street. As they drank their dark beers they watched the groundskeeper on his big lawnmower and said hey, everyone has a lawnmower.
Ken Jones on his lawnmower, photo courtesy of Powell's Imaging and Photography Ken Jones on his lawnmower, photo courtesy of Powell's Imaging and Photography
Ken Jones said K&N Filters are popular in the lawn mower racing circuit, photo courtesy of Powell's Imaging and Photography
Ken Jones said K&N Filters are popular in the lawn mower racing circuit, photo courtesy of Powell's Imaging and Photograph
Thirty-some years later across the pond, folklore has turned into fact. The United States Lawn Mower racing association began on April Fools Day in 1992. The weekend chore is now a competitive sport with rules. There are dozens of state chapters and six classes. The classes include the factory experimental, stock, international mow of weeks and three prepared classes, the AP, SP and BP that vary on the size of the motor.
Ken Jones races his No. 6 lawnmower, phot courtesy of Powell's Imaging and Photography Ken Jones races his No.6 Lawnmower, photo courtesy of Powell's Imaging and Photography

Ken Jones is a former president of the Illinois USLMRA chapter and races in the AP portion of the IMOW class. “I used to race flat track motorcycles,” said Jones. “It just got too expensive. I saw lawn mower racing for the first time on television and knew I had to do it.” Jones has been racing for 14 years total and lawnmower racing for the past five years.”

Jones said it’s never dull. “We race at civic functions and fairs and we are dedicated racers,” he said. “Our machines are highly modified versions of the average lawn mower. We are capable of speeds anywhere from 25 to 60 mph. Some sound like small block Chevy’s and are clocked at 90 mph.”

Jones knows lawn mowers. He can build them and repair them. “I use K&N Engineering air filters and wouldn’t use anything else,” said Jones. “A lot of guys at the track use them on the circuit. Nothing else protects our engines like K&N.”

The 2007 USLMRA season is over, but will begin again on Aprils Fools Day in 2008 and continue through Labor Day. “I finished in the top 20 in my AP class,” said Jones. “I go across the country racing for trophies and bragging rights. It’s a blast.”

Jones said his lawnmower looks like Travis Kvapil’s Truck in the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series. “We’re both No.6, we both use K&N,” he said. “Next year I would love to have my lawnmower next to the No.6 K&N Filters Ford F-150, just for one picture.”

Hey, almost everyone has a lawnmower and a truck.

Follow Ken Jones's progress throughout the racing season at the K&N news site. Find K&N products for your vehicle using the K&N application search then use the K&N dealer search to find a K&N dealer in your part of the world.

Horizontal Advertisement


Did you like this story? Select 1 to 5 stars to rate it.

K&N Engineering, Inc., with headquarters in Riverside, California, has been the world's leader in performance filter technology since 1969, serving the needs of the automotive, motorcycle, marine, industrial and military markets. K&N is heavily involved in nearly every form of motorsports from off-road and powersports to drag racing, stock cars and road racing. For more information about K&N Filters, please contact K&N Engineering, Inc., P.O. Box 1329, Riverside, CA 92502-1329, (800) 213-4182 for a dealer near you, (800) 858-3333 for technical service/questions, (951) 826-4001 Fax, e-mail tech@knfilters.com, or visit www.knfilters.com.